cell biology of molybdenum in plants and humans

  • Cell biology of molybdenum in plants and humans

    Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): https://doi /10.1016/j.bbam... (external link)

  • The neurotransmitter receptor-anchoring protein gephyrin ...

     · The molybdenum cofactor (Moco) forms the catalytically active center of all molybdoenzymes except nitrogenase . It consists of a molybdenum coordinated to the unique pterin compound molybdopterin (MPT). The cofactor is highly conserved in Archaea, eubacteria, and eukaryotes . Molybdoenzymes are essential for such diverse metabolic processes as ...

  • Why Molybdenum Is an Essential Nutrient

     · Molybdenum toxicity is rare and studies in humans are limited. However, in animals, very high levels have been linked to reduced growth, kidney failure, infertility and diarrhea ( 19 ).

  • Molybdenum: Function, Deficiency & Benefits

     · Molybdenum helps with energy production, by breaking down some of the amino acids; cell protection, by activating antioxidants; and waste removal, by metabolizing toxins that can be …

  • Biology of the molybdenum cofactor | Journal of ...

     · Introduction. The transition element molybdenum (Mo) is an essential micronutrient for plants, animals, and most micro-organisms (Sigel and Sigel, 2002) soils, the molybdate anion is the only form of Mo that is available for plants and bacteria (Stiefel, 2002).To this end, more than 50 enzymes are known to contain Mo and most of them occur in bacteria, while in plants only four were …

  • Molybdenum for Copper Toxicity — Mineral Balancing

     · Molybdenum is transported into cells via Mot1 at the cell and endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and Mot2 transports molybdenum from cellular compartments into the cytoplasm (Tejada-Jiménez M, 2011). Once inside the cell, molybdate bonds …

  • NEET Masterclass in Biology 2 Mineral Nutrition Questions ...

    Masterclass in Biology 1. Clear Chapter Wise. Digestion and Absorption. Breathing and Exchange of Gases. Body Fluids and Circulation. Excretory Products and their Elimination. Locomotion and Movement. Neural Control and Coordination. Chemical Coordination and Integration.

  • Impact of Molybdenum Compounds as Anticancer Agents

     · Molybdenum is a vital trace element for humans, animals, and plants. It serves as an essential trace element in the nutrition of plants. Molybdenum in trace concentration can be found in plant-derived foods like cereal grains, cheese, leafy vegetables, legumes, milk, nuts, and organ meats.

  • A Mutation in the Gene for the Neurotransmitter ...

     · A sequence comparison revealed homologies between gephyrin and proteins necessary for the biosynthesis of the universal molybdenum cofactor (MoCo). Because gephyrin expression can rescue a MoCo-deficient mutation in bacteria, plants, and a murine cell line, it became clear that gephyrin also plays a role in MoCo biosynthesis.

  • Molybdenum | Linus Pauling Institute | Oregon State University

    Drug interactions. High doses of molybdenum have been found to inhibit the metabolism of acetaminophen in rats ; however, it is not known whether this occurs at clinically relevant doses in humans.. Linus Pauling Institute Recommendation . The RDA for molybdenum (45 μg/day for adults) is sufficient to prevent deficiency. Although the intake of molybdenum most likely to promote optimum …

  • Review Cell biology of molybdenum

    Cell biology of molybdenum ... Steps three and four in plants and humans are catalyzed by the individual domains of Cnx1 (G and E) or Gephyrin (G and E). (For interpretation of the references to colour in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

  • MOLYBDENUM: Overview, Uses, Side Effects, Precautions ...

    Molybdenum is an essential trace mineral. It is found in foods such as milk, cheese, cereal grains, legumes, nuts, leafy vegetables, and organ meats. Molybdenum is most commonly used for ...

  • Molybdenum | Linus Pauling Institute | Oregon State University

    The molybdenum atom is part of the molybdenum cofactor in the active site of four enzymes in humans: sulfite oxidase, xanthine oxidase, aldehyde oxidase, and mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component. (More information) Excess molybdenum intake causes fatal copper deficiency diseases in grazing animals. Their rumen is the site of high sulfide ...

  • Role of Boron in Plant Nutrition and Human Health

    From the total B in soil, only about 10% is available to plants, however, plant tissues contain 10-100 mg B kg-1 D wt. or more (in case of excess) Boron is taken up by the plant roots in the form of boric acid or borate. Most of the absorbed boron found to localize in the cell wall and the extension zone and tips of …

  • The plant Mo-hydroxylases aldehyde oxidase and xanthine ...

    The plant molybdenum-cofactor (Moco) and flavin-containing enzymes, xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH; EC 1.2.1.37) and aldehyde oxidase (AO; EC 1.2.3.1) are thought to play important metabolic roles in purine metabolism and hormone biosynthesis, respectively. Their animal counterparts contribute to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in numerous pathologies and here we examined these …

  • Cell biology of molybdenum in plants and humans

    Cell biology of molybdenum in plants and humans Biochim Biophys Acta. 2012 Sep;1823(9):1568-79. doi: 10.1016/j.bbamcr.2012.02.007. Epub 2012 Feb 17. Authors ... Humans Infant, Newborn Iron / metabolism Metalloproteins / chemistry ...

  • MOLYBDENUM COFACTOR BIOSYNTHESIS AND MOLYBDENUM …

    AbstractThe molybdenum cofactor (Moco) forms the active site of all eukaryotic molybdenum (Mo) enzymes. Moco consists of molybdenum covalently bound to two sulfur atoms of a unique tricyclic pterin moiety referred to as molybdopterin. Moco is synthesized from GTP by an ancient and conserved biosynthetic pathway that can be divided into four steps involving the biosynthetic intermediates cyclic ...

  • Cell biology of molybdenum in plants | SpringerLink

     · The transition element molybdenum (Mo) is of essential importance for (nearly) all biological systems as it is required by enzymes catalyzing important reactions within the cell. The metal itself is biologically inactive unless it is complexed by a special cofactor. With the exception of bacterial nitrogenase, where Mo is a constituent of the FeMo-cofactor, Mo is bound to a pterin, thus ...

  • Molybdenum Cofactor Biosynthesis in Humans: Identification ...

     · The human MOCS3 protein contains an N-terminal domain similar to the Escherichia coli MoeB protein and a C-terminal segment displaying similarities to the sulfurtransferase rhodanese.MOCS3 is proposed to catalyze both the adenylation and the subsequent generation of a thiocarboxylate group at the C-terminus of the smaller subunit of molybdopterin (MPT) synthase during Moco biosynthesis in humans.

  • Cell Biology of Molybdenum | SpringerLink

     · In: Gresshoff PM (ed) Plant biotechnology and development – current topics in plant molecular biology, 1st edn. CRC Press, Boca Raton, pp 11–16 Google Scholar Mendel RR, Schwarz G (2002) Biosynthesis and molecular biology of the molybdenum cofactor (Moco).

  • Cell biology of molybdenum in plants

    The transition element molybdenum (Mo) is of essential importance for (nearly) all biological systems as it is required by enzymes catalyzing important reactions within the cell. The metal itself is biologically inactive unless it is complexed by a special cofactor. With the exception of bacterial n …

  • Cell Biology of Metals and Nutrients | SpringerLink

    Plants are composed of 17 essential and at least 5 beneficial elements, and these must be taken up as metal or nutrient ions to allow for growth and cell division. Much effort has been devoted to studying the physiology and biochemistry of metals and nutrients in plants. The aspect of cell biology, however, is an emerging new field and much ...

  • Plants

    Molybdenum: Molybdenum is present in the soil as dissolved molybdate ions, in an exchangeable form adsorbed to soil particles, and in a non-exchangeable form. It is absorbed by the plants as molybdate ions (MoO 4 2-). Functions of Molybdenum: (i) Initially molybdenum was shown to be essential for nitrogen fixation by Azotobacter chroococcum.

  • Molybdoproteomes and evolution of molybdenum utilization

     · Introduction. The trace element molybdenum (Mo) occurs in a wide variety of metalloenzymes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, where it forms part of active sites of these enzymes. 1 – 3 Except for the iron-Mo cofactor (FeMoco) in nitrogenase, Mo is complexed by pterin molecules, thereby generating the molybdenum cofactor (Moco or molybdopterin) in Mo-dependent enzymes …

  • Biology4Kids : Plants: Man and Plants

    Humans and Plants Humans need plants. All animals do. Humanity''s relationship with plants has actually made it possible for us to have a civilization. Before we had cities, humans went around in little packs and were hunter-gatherers. We ate rats, birds, berries, …

  • Transition metal

    Transition metal - Transition metal - Biological functions of transition metals: Several transition metals are important to the chemistry of living systems, the most familiar examples being iron, cobalt, copper, and molybdenum. Iron is by far the most widespread and important transition metal that has a function in living systems; proteins containing iron participate in two main processes ...

  • Molybdenum cofactors, enzymes and pathways | Nature

     · The neurotransmitter receptor-anchoring protein gephyrin reconstitutes molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis in bacteria, plants, and mammalian cells. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 96, 1333–1338 (1999).

  • Variation in Molybdenum Content Across Broadly Distributed ...

     · Author Summary Plants must acquire all the mineral nutrients they require for survival from the complex chemical and biological environment of the soil. A better understanding of the way plants do this would not only allow improvements in sustainable agricultural productivity, but could also improve human health through enhancement of the nutritional quality of foods.

  • Mechanistic insights into the treatment of iron-deficiency ...

     · Mendel RR, Kruse T. Cell biology of molybdenum in plants and humans. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2012;1823:1568–79. CAS PubMed Article PubMed Central Google Scholar

  • Human cells, plants, worms and frogs share mechanism for ...

     · Human cells, plants, worms and frogs share mechanism for organ placement. by Tufts University. Targeting a blue tracer molecule to one of two cells at the first cell …

  • Cell biology of molybdenum | Semantic Scholar

    The transition element molybdenum (Mo) is an essential micronutrient that is needed as catalytically active metal during enzyme catalysis. In humans four enzymes depend on Mo: sulfite oxidase, xanthine oxidoreductase, aldehyde oxidase, and mitochondrial amidoxime reductase. In addition to these enzymes, plants harbor a fifth Mo‐enzyme namely nitrate reductase.

  • The ''how'' and ''where'' of plant microRNAs

    The cell biology of miRNA biogenesis: dicing bodies, nuclear export and RISC loading The nucleus is the site of pri-miRNA processing in Arabidopsis (Papp et al ., 2003 ). Live-cell imaging revealed that DCL1 and HYL1 colocalize in round and membrane-less nuclear bodies, namely dicing bodies, which range in number from zero to four in each cell ...

  • Biology of the molybdenum cofactor

    molybdenum from its uptake into the cell, via formation of the molybdenum cofactor and its storage, to the final modification of the molybdenum cofactor and its in-sertion into apo-metalloenzymes will be reviewed. Key words: Aldehyde oxidase, Arabidopsis thaliana, molybdenum cofactor, nitrate reductase, sulphite oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase.

  • Molybdenum wire reel, 25m, diameter 0.125mm, annealed, 99 ...

    Cell biology of molybdenum in plants and humans. Ralf R Mendel et al. Biochimica et biophysica acta, 1823(9), 1568-1579 (2012-03-01) ... Molybdenum metabolism in the alga Chlamydomonas stands at the crossroad of those in Arabidopsis and humans. Angel Llamas et al.

  • Biosynthesis of the Iron-Molybdenum Cofactor of ...

    The iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co), located at the active site of the molybdenum nitrogenase, is one of the most complex metal cofactors known to date. During the past several years, an intensive effort has been made to purify the proteins involved in FeMo-co synthesis and incorporation into nitrogenase. This effort is starting to provide insights into the structures of the FeMo-co ...

  • Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Microbiology of Molybdenum …

    Molybdenum is an essential element for life, with growing production due to a constantly expanding variety of industrial applications. The potentially harmful effects of Mo on the environment, and on human and ecosystem health, require knowledge of Mo behavior in mining-affected environments. Mo is usually present in trace amounts in ore deposits, but mining exploitation can lead to wastes ...

  • Molybdenum and enzymes

    Cell biology of molybdenum in plants and humans. The transition element molybdenum (Mo) needs to be complexed by a special cofactor in order to gain catalytic activity. With the exception of bacterial Mo-nitrogenase, where Mo is a constituent of the FeMo-cofactor, Mo is bound to a pterin, thus forming the molybdenum cofactor Moco, which in ...

  • Boron and molybdenum: unlocking agronomic potential.

    The micronutrients boron and molybdenum are essential plant nutrients. Boron affects at least 15 plant functions. Its control of phenols and lignin protects forage quality and benefits animal performance. Molybdenum is required by all leguminous plants because they use nitrogenase, a molybdenum-containing enzyme, to fix atmospheric nitrogen. A second molybdenum-containing enzyme, nitrate...

  • The First Step of Neurospora crassa Molybdenum Cofactor ...

    In eukaryotes, the first step of Moco biosynthesis is generally assumed to be localized in the mitochondria of the cell [3,4]. While in plants, this step is encoded by two gene loci (cnx2 and cnx3), in humans and the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa (N. crassa), a single gene locus (MOCS1 and nit-7, respectively) encodes both domains ...

  • Comparative genomics of molybdenum utilization in ...

     · Mendel RR, Bittner F. Cell biology of molybdenum. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1763;2006:621–35. Google Scholar 2. Mendel RR, Kruse T. Cell biology of molybdenum in plants and humans. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2012;1823:1568–79. CAS …